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Your very own ‘Staffordshire Hoard’?

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Lot 89: A GEORGE III NEW COINAGE 1820 GOLD
SOVEREIGN (closed “2”) 
£300-500 sold for £320

A specialist coin valuation day set to take place on Thursday 19th September could provide the chance for you to discover whether those old coins you inherited hold significant value as collectables.

 
The event will take place at Cuttlestones’ Auctioneers & Valuers Pinfold Lane auction room in Penkridge from 10am – 3pm, with coin specialist Adrian Simmons on hand to offer his expert opinion on items presented. With coins having been in circulation for some 2,500 years the field is vast – and the chance of finding a real gem always present – as Adrian explains:
 
Almost every household probably has some old coins lying about – coin collecting has been popular pretty much since they started to be used as currency in Asia Minor. The Romans were big coin collectors, archaeological excavations in Britain have produced Saxon graves with Celtic coins in them that had been re-used as jewellery and, during the Renaissance, nobility and merchants amassed large collections of classical coins.
 
Coin collecting is just as popular today, which means great prices can be achieved – Chinese and foreign coins are becoming increasingly sought-after with the advent of internet bidding.”
 
Record figures achieved for coins at auction attest to the health of the marketplace – an Edward III (1327-1377) gold florin / double leopard, found with a metal detector, fetched £460,000 in 2006. A Coenwulf (796-821), King of Mercia, gold penny achieved £230,000 in 2004 and a Henry III (1216-1272) gold twenty penny, went for £149,950 in 1996. The highest price yet achieved for a coin was $10,016,875 for a USA 1794 silver dollar in January this year at US auction house Stacks & Bowers.
 
However, it’s not just very old – or exotic – coins that can be valuable, as Adrian explains:
 
What I imagine we’re most likely to see at the valuation event are British coins from the 19th & 20th Century; which can range in value from pence to thousands of pounds each, depending on their rarity and condition. But, as we’re in Staffordshire, and the biggest haul of Anglo Saxon treasure was discovered virtually on our doorstep, there’s always the chance that something much older and more valuable could crop up.”
 
Whether you’re considering selling your collection, would like an idea of its value for insurance purposes or are simply intrigued to find out the age and origin of your coins, pop into Cuttlestones in Penkridge between 10am – 3pm on Thursday, 19th September. You never know, you may unwittingly have the next ‘Staffordshire Hoard’ on your hands! W: www.cuttlestones.co.uk T: 01785 714905
 
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